Who “we” are

This is part of an ongoing research project by Dr. Adrienne Shaw (Temple University) with sponsorship from  Refiguring Innovation in Games (ReFiG) and the Temple Digital Scholarship Center. Dr. Shaw is an assistant professor in the Department of Media Studies and Production at Temple University and a Lew Klein College of Media and Communications PhD program faculty member. Her primary areas of research are video games, gaming culture, the politics of representation, gender and sexuality, and qualitative research. She is author of the book Gaming at the Edge: Sexuality and Gender at the Margins of Gamer Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2014).

Research related to this archive is being conducted along with researchers at the UC Davis ModLab, specifically Evan W. Lauteria:

Evan W. Lauteria is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of California-Davis, where he works in the UC-Davis “ModLab,” an interdisciplinary digital humanities and video games research lab. His primary research interests include production of culture, formal organizations, video games, gender and sexuality, and comparative-historical methods. He is the co-editor of Rated M for Mature: Sex and Sexuality in Video Games (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015), and his current research is a comparative-historical analysis of Nintendo and Sega’s business practices in the 1980s and 90s.

Research assistance from Temple University has been provided by (or is being provided by):

Summer 2016/Spring 2017: Christopher Persaud is a senior at Temple University studying Sociology, French, and LGBT Studies. His research interests broadly include popular culture, identity construction on/through digital mediums, and the social dimensions of new media technologies. He hopes to pursue graduate school opportunities in Sociology and/or Media Studies sometime in the near future.

Fall 2016/Spring 2017: Nirvan West is a senior at Temple University studying Visual Anthropology. His research involves ethnographic analysis of digital worlds and the systems that dictate them. His work touches on subcultures based on/around gaming and the evolution of the gamer identity.

Spring/Summer 2015: Elizaveta Friesem (PhD, Temple University; PhD, St. Petersburg State University, Russia) is an affiliated faculty of Media Education Lab. In her primary research Elizaveta combines principles of media literacy education, media studies, and gender studies in order to promote gender equality and diversity. http://www.elizavetafriesem.com

Spring 2015: Zara Trommer

Information architecture and design support provided by:

Shane A. McGarry is a PhD candidate in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University in Ireland. His work is focused on the exploration of new UI metaphors in support of alternative reading modalities in digital environments. Prior to his PhD, Shane spent 15 years as a Software Engineer and UI Designer. Find him on twitter at @irishgeek79 or on his website: www.shanemcgarry.com.

Additional entries on specific games have been added by:

Joshua D. Savage is a PhD student at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is a writer, designer, educator, and former game developer who has taught in the United States, Japan, and Europe. His research interests include behaviour in online game playing communities, learning in digital games, and data preservation. He is a contributing writer for gamedevelopers.ie.

Mass Effect entries by: Leandro Augusto Borges Lima is a PhD candidate at King’s College London, department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries. My research explores the uses of videogame as a medium for political conversation, focusing on matters of gender and sexuality, through a case study of the game Mass Effect.

Divine Divinity entries by: Sawyer Kemp is a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Davis studying contemporary performance, accessibility, and digital gaming.  They are currently collaborating with the UC Davis ModLab on the motion-capture performance game Play The Knave, a Shakespeare video game with installations at multiple theater sites in the US & Canada.

BioShock entries by: Cody Mejeur is a PhD student in English at Michigan State University, where he studies narrative theory and video game narrative in particular. He is also adjunct faculty at Ivy Tech Community College. His online portfolio is located at: cmejeur.com.

An additional entry for BioShock Infinite was sent in by: Emily R Foster-Brown is currently an MA student at the University of Sheffield where her research focuses on
Judeo-Christian religions & video games, through a lens of feminist theory. In October 2016 she
will start work on her PhD currently titled “Religion, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Video Games”. http://www.emilyfosterbrown.co.uk

Simon the Sorcerer 2 entry by: Benjamin Sipes is a third year Animal Biology major with a double minor in Sociology and Psychology at the University of California, Davis. His interests span from the biological, through the neurological, and into the networks of the social world. His current projects are on intranasal oxytocin in Titi monkeys and an analysis of JRPG strategy and complexity.

A Closed World entry by: Todd Harper is a professor in the program in Simulation and Digital Entertainment at the University of Baltimore. His research focuses on queer and gender issues in games, particularly representation, as well as e-sports and competitive gaming. Website: http://www.chaoticblue.com

Dreamfall Chapters and Firewatch entries by: Mike Burns is a PhD candidate at the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies at Drew University, where he studies gender and sexuality in American popular culture, internet culture and online communities, as well as the role of technology in the formation of queer identity. His current research focuses on the history of masculinity and heteronormativity in “geek” subcultures such as videogames and comics, and how this history informs movements against greater diversity in these spaces.

The Sims entries by: Kady Kidd is a doctoral student in English and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. Their research focuses on reparative and paranoid practices in video game fandoms.

Editorial assistance provided by:

Cathy Hannabach, www.cathyhannabach.com

Web content assistance provided by:

Cathy Heard, www.cathleenmheard.com